Business Card Design & Print – Tips For Businesses

Regardless of your business area, your business cards are a reflection of your company and its services. You need to spend time and effort in creating the perfect business card, it’s style, design, texture and even font to be used has to be be meticulously thought out to ensure your business is reflected in the manner you want.

Card Design & Print – Which Colour to choose?

Handing over your business card to a potential customer is one of the most defining moments in your business relationship. Make sure you present your best foot forward with every customer and business card you present. We recommend using colour on your business cards. The use of colour engages the customer and ensures they react to the key messages you want to promote. Experts advise you to avoid making your business card look like a bag of skittles fell on it however, and focusing on your key corporate colours is also recommended. If however you don’t have corporate colours defined just quite yet, then here are some pointers for their creation.

Purples and Creams or gradients of soft colours will adopt a more creative feel while the use of strong solid colours will promote the thought provoking side of your business. Vibrant and bright colours ultimately present your business as creative and forward-thinking.

Card Design & Print – Which font?

As with the choice of colour, picking the right font is critical to presenting the right corporate image to potential businesses and clients. It’s probably best not to overcrowd your card with different fonts and with this in mind, no more than two should be used. Possibly a normal font and the bold version of this for business title. Depending on the nature of your business, you can select the right type of font to suit your needs and business goals. Contemporary, young and vibrant businesses stick to bolder and more slick fonts, whereas traditional businesses tend to use more contemporary fonts.

No matter which font you use, make sure all your detail and text on your business card are clearly understandable on the card. There is no point having a well designed card with illegible text.

Card Design & Print – Got a Logo? Use it!

At this point your probably going to ask, why would I not put my logo on my business card, well some businesses may not have one designed, others may not recognize its importance, and finally, others may have just have forgotten to use it. Let this be your reminder. Forgetting to put your logo on the card is the cardinal sin, havent got one designed yet? Well that’s another matter. Prominently position your logo on the business card, but remember there is only a little space on the card, so don’t make it overpowering. Ensure you use a high resolution version of 300dpi or more as this will ensure you get photo quality representation from your printer.

Design & Print – What size is my business Card?

If your in the United States the general business card size is 91mm x 50mm, however in the United Kingdom it is 85mm x 55mm. On occasion people differentiate from these general sizes, but where they gain in creativity, they lose in usability. The average size of pocket in a purse or wallet in the UK is 87mm x 60mm providing just enough space for a few business cards in their wallet. Differentiating from this size will more likely result in your business card being put in an unfamiliar position and being misplaced.

Once You Choose a Business, Quit Looking – If the Grass is Greener, You Are in the Wrong Business

If this scenario has not happened to you, you either haven’t been trying to get something going online for very long, or you did your homework first.

You go surfing for the next, best business opportunity– the one that will put all others to shame. You give out your name, email, and phone a few times, and before you know it, your mailbox is filling up, your phone is ringing, and you see even more opportunities than you knew existed. A few of them look interesting, so you enter your information a few more times. You look up, and are positive you are getting mail from everyone in the universe. Finally, you pick one out, give them your money, put your name on the replicated company website, and wait for the money to pour in. And wait. And wait. Finally, to fight the frustration and boredom of a virgin website (not been visited by anyone but you), you start the search all over again. Sound familiar?

Continually surfing the net for your next business opportunity before you have gotten the one you are on up and going, is a sure sign you are not in the right business. If you aren’t happy with the company, the products, the pay plan, or the training, it’s time to move on. This time, be sure you are making the right choice. don’t make your decision about which business to join without doing all of your homework first. If you don’t have a concrete set of guidelines that your business has to meet, you will be tossed to and fro by the hype more than by how the opportunity fits you and your situation.

For help in setting up your guidelines, read my four part series entitled “Evaluating an Online Business– Things You Should Know…” It will give you some guidelines for developing your own checklist, and how to stick with what you want. If you choose the correct business for you to start with, the time you are surfing the net now for another business will be spent building the business you have. Once you start a business, stick with it and give it your full attention. You will not be successful if you don’t actually work at it, and you will not actually work it unless you have taken the time to find the correct business for you.

If you would like to see a business whose “business” is teaching you everything you need to know about the building a stable and successful Internet marketing business, check out TheLastBestBiz.

The Kitchen & Bath Business Marketing Plan Should Be Flexible, Cost Effective & Brand The Dealership

Like most Kitchen & Bath Dealers, when I opened my dealership, I had a rough business plan and an idea of how I was going to market.

It was generalized and not very detailed. Sound familiar? I think the biggest mistake made was I really did not do a Market Study of who was doing what level of Kitchen & Baths in my market area. How can you get specific if you don’t understand the details of your market, market area, and market prospects?

A comprehensive Marketing Analysis should first look at the overall industry as a whole, then you would define your market geographically, demographically and sociographically. In English,that means, what area of the map, who lives their and what is their income, home value, etc, etc. I cannot stress this enough. Know Who, What & Where your going to target your marketing so that you don’t waste money on advertising outside those parameters.

Which is your business going to focus on,The consumer, home builder, allied professionals etc. Of course you will do projects for all of them, but your pricing and marketing strategy has to focus on one or two of them. Don’t be a “Jack of all trades, Master of none”. You should come out of your marketing analysis phase with a clear understanding of who you are, who your primary client base is and how you are going to compare with the competition in your market area.

Your Marketing Strategy should define your goal. What do you expect to accomplish and what is your budget. Remember, it doesn’t matter how big or small of a firm you are, you should always have a clear, defined budget and stick to it.

The percentages I spoke about in the last newsletter are very accurate and every Kitchen & Bath business should try and stick to them. For your review:

New business 7-8%

2-3 Year old business is 5-7%

An established business is 3- 5 %.

Remember to ad 2- 4% for brand development if your a new business.

When you do your plan in advance and stick to it, a side benefit is with truthfulness you can tell the advertising sales people that constantly call on your business- ” My budget & plan is already spoken for this year, Thank you.”

Timing is important, you should set your budget on the current years sales /overhead expenditure percentages for the following fiscal year. The 3rd Quarter is when you start to do the spending comparisons from previous year and in the middle of the 4th quarter your budget for the following year should be set.

Next step is to figure out how your going to communicate your strategy that you have defined, then you have to test the results. Some examples of Target Markets and some specific strategies that you might consider. Each market is different and you have different dealer profiles, so bear with me as I offer some examples.

The best marketing is one on one, direct contact with the prospect. Go out and get the prospects, don’t just sit in the showroom and wait for them to come in. As a rep, I just love sales people that say ” Oh man, business is slow this quarter, and yet their butts haven’t moved off the chair in front of the computer with solitaire on the screen..I digress….sorry. 🙂 If you know who your target prospect is from your analysis, there is no excuse why not to go after them.

A Newsletter, keeps in touch with your existing client base, while a Four Color Brochure, introducing your firm and its services-with Testimonials will help turn new prospects into clients. You can do this economically and along with one on one dialog be effective. These provide both flexible and cost effective marketing tools.

I find that Direct Mail Advertising only attracts the price shopper, looking for a “deal”, and I am not convinced at a 2 % response rate that it is cost effective. The big 4 Color Slicks Magazines are great for Branding, but you need to do it correctly commit to two years at every other month, It is certainly costly and most effective for branding your business with affluent prospect. It is a mistake to spend all of your marketing dollars on the 4 color slick magazines. I find that putting ads in the local Theatre and Opera Programs will do the same branding with the same affluent prospect and are less costly.

I had done some TV on the Cable Channels such as HGTV, I found that to be as effective as the 4 color slick with some side benefits. It reaches the mighty middle prospect and affluent prospect (depending on which show it airs.) A pleasant side effect is that if you do a tasteful ad and the principle is on then your existing client base is reminded of you and talks about you. (More of a reason to earn those A referrals) It is more cost effective than the 4 Color Slicks and I believe does more in the short run. I think TV, radio done right really works, but it is a big budget item. I know how to get the production done, what to look for in the statistics of who is watching what and how well it can Brand your business. I am not talking about one of those cheesy cable commercials either.

These examples are just a few of many, many. Each firm is different, that’s why you need to Analysis, Strategize & Plan specifically for your business. Stick to a budget and timetable and be flexible. Follow the yellow brick road to your business pot of gold.